University of Pretoria Logo
English |  Afrikaans |    
  
Aikido
Welcome to TuksAikido   
 

 

AIKIDO IS A TRADITIONAL JAPANESE SYSTEM OF SELF-DEFENCE INVOLVING THROWS AND JOINT LOCKS TECHNIQUES.   

Though these can be painful and induce immediate submission, they are normally applied in a graceful manner so as not to cause injury. 

 

  • It is the objective of AIKIDO to contribute to the quality of our society by encouraging a   chivalric and moral code of behaviour.   Students of Aikido train both body and spirit with the intention of becoming sincere and more rounded individuals. To practice the art requires discipline, diligent study and hard training of all its practitioners.
  • AIKIDO also teaches us to defend ourselves. One learns to face many opponents simultaneously. To be able to do this it requires discipline and the polishing and perfection of the executed techniques to the finest detail.
  •  AIKIDO will help you to develop powerful and confident movement. It is practiced by people of all ages and physical make-up, by women and men alike. The techniques do not demand physical strength or an aggressive spirit.
  • AIKIDO is practiced in a non-competitive atmosphere. Strength is not matched with strength and force is subtly redirected by means of flowing circular movements. Since the techniques require flexibility, balance and timing, there is no need to oppose the force of the attack. We blend with the attack, take control and redirect it safely and effectively.
  •  AIKIDO offers excellent exercise. It is a proven way of restoring and preserving a supple and healthy body. It is a good way of expending energy, to stimulate the heart and to tone the body. It helps one to acquire agile movement and speed of reaction. This is useful in everyday life.
  •  AIKIDO practice is always done in pairs. Through regular practice you learn from others and others learn from you. Practice is practical, energetic and FUN!
  •  AIKIDO literally means "The Way of Harmony"   It is essentially non-competitive and non-violent. It is regarded as a subtle and graceful martial art, effective but also suited for gentle people. It addresses moral values and offers a practical way of life.

 

 

The Pretoria Aikikai (Aikido Association), incorporating TuksAikido, is affiliated to the Aikido Federation of South Africa (AFSA), a recognised authority for the teaching of Aikido in South Africa by the International Federation and the Aikikai Foundation, Tokyo, Japan.

The club has close ties with Aikido groups in Japan, Italy, Guam, Great Britain, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Australia, Russia, China, Canada and Reunion.  Seminars and exchanges take place at regular intervals.

Beginners are always welcome.  First-timers are encouraged to first observe a practice session and to get familiar with the objectives of the art before they enrol as members.

One joins TuksAikido by filling out the appropriate forms, available from the instructor and by paying the prescribed fees.

 

News

Dawie Roodt emphasises the key role played by universities in economic growth in South Africa - 18/11/2014
As part of the Informatics/Gijima lecture series presented at the University of Pretoria, Dawie Roodt, Director and Chief Economist of the Efficient Group, spoke about how he views the next ten years from an economist’s perspective. As a nationally renowned economist who specialises in government finance and monetary policy he focused on the importance of private property rights and also referred to how humankind has evolved over time.
[Read More]
 
Energetics gives new insight into the decline of cheetahs - 18/11/2014
An acclaimed international study looking into new reasons behind the dwindling numbers of cheetah in southern Africa had its inception at the University of Pretoria. Before this study, it was commonly thought that cheetah numbers were declining partly as a result of larger predators stealing their prey, thus lessening the availability of food and forcing them to expend more energy in search of food. However, a recent study offers new insight into why cheetahs may become vulnerable with regard to their energy levels, which could affect their general health and well-being and result in their ultimate decline.
[Read More]
 
Pioneering publication by UP academic - 18/11/2014
Prof Alois Mlambo, Head of the Department of Historical and Heritage Studies, recently launched his latest book, which was well received by academics, critics and readers. Entitled A history of Zimbabwe, the book is the first concise, single-volume history of Zimbabwe and provides an accessible and comprehensive synthesis of that country’s lived experience from the pre-colonial and colonial periods to recent times in independent Zimbabwe.
[Read More]
 
Theology researchers recognised by the National Research Foundation - 14/11/2014
Prof Hans van Oort’s NRF A-rating was recently renewed for the next five years, while Prof Etienne de Villiers received a C2-rating from the NRF. This brings the Faculty of Theology's rated scholars to 16 – one A, one B, 13 Cs and one Y.
[Read More]
 
UP researcher finds ways to improve the well-being of wildlife - 07/11/2014
Although wild animals have been captured and chemically immobilised for years (by using a form of anaesthesia induced by drugs in a dart), very little is known about the short- and long-term consequences of capture and the effects of immobilising drugs on wild animals. Dr Leith Meyer, Veterinary Sciences Pharmacology researcher at the University of Pretoria, is committed to finding solutions to improve the well-being of wild animals. The results of his research will help wildlife veterinarians and other conservation practitioners to ensure that the best methods of capture are practised and optimal immobilising drug cocktails and treatments are used.
[Read More]
 
Giving the defenceless a voice in court - 06/11/2014
Crimes committed against people with developmental and other disabilities are similar in scope to crimes committed against women, children and the elderly, and yet the victimisation of people with disabilities remains largely unaddressed. This can be ascribed to their being perceived as voiceless and invisible members of society – a perception that makes them attractive targets for their perpetrators because they often believe that their victims will not be able to testify against them in court. Three large-scale research studies are currently under way at the University of Pretoria (UP) to change this situation.
[Read More]
 
Dr Johan van Zyl named Sunday Times Business Leader of the Year - 05/11/2014
Dr Johan van Zyl, former Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University of Pretoria and one of the University’s most distinguished alumni, was named Sunday Times Business Leader of the Year at a ceremony at the Sandton Convention Centre on Tuesday night, 28 October. The Sunday Times Business Leader of the Year award is a prestigious accolade bestowed on recipients voted for by executives of the top 100 companies of the previous year.
[Read More]
 


 Highlights on the Yearly Calendar:

  • Summer School (An international four day event during early summer)
  • Winter School (An international four day event during mid winter)
  • Instructor's Course (A dedicated masters classes for instructors)
  • Martial Arts Day and Demonstrations at the Japanese Embassy, Pretoria.
  • Grading Examinations at regular intervals throughout the year.
  • Developmental Project and Self Defense classes for women and children (As advertised)