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Department of Procedural Law

Courts had to consider many aspects when granting bail to suspects.

By Elzet Hurter

Posted on 23 March 2012

Worker shot for being late fears for life - Professor Wium de Villiers from the Department Procedural Law said the courts had to consider many aspects when granting bail to suspects.


Posing a danger to society and intimidating witnesses were strong reasons for bail not to be granted, he said.

Although it was in the interests of justice to grant bail, the court also had to look at whether there was a likelihood that the suspect could be a danger to society.

“If one is arrested for attempted murder and while on bail is then arrested for murder, that is a strong indication that it might not be advisable to grant bail,” De Villiers said.

He added, however, that refusing bail was not intended as punishment for an alleged offender.

It served the interests of justice and the rights of a suspect, who was innocent until proved guilty, that he or she could attend his or her trial while being free on bail.

Access the comprehensive article of 10 February 2012.


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